God Is Greater Than Man: Who is like unto the LORD our God

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Job 33:12: "Behold, in this thou art not just: I will answer thee, that God is greater than man."

Here are some King James Version (KJV) Bible verses that convey similar themes of God’s supreme power, wisdom, and distinction from humanity:

  1. Isaiah 40:25: “To whom then will ye liken me, or shall I be equal? saith the Holy One.”
  2. Psalm 8:3-4: “When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?”
  3. Job 11:7-8: “Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know?”
  4. Romans 11:33: “O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!”
  5. 1 Corinthians 1:25: “Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.”
  6. Psalm 113:5: “Who is like unto the LORD our God, who dwelleth on high?”
  7. Jeremiah 32:17: “Ah Lord GOD! behold, thou hast made the heaven and the earth by thy great power and stretched out arm, and there is nothing too hard for thee:”
  8. Psalm 147:5: “Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite.”
These verses accentuate the vastness of God's wisdom, power, and nature in comparison to human beings. They highlight the idea that God's ways, thoughts, and actions are beyond human comprehension, and His magnificence and might are unparalleled. The overarching message is the immeasurable greatness of God in contrast to the limitations of human beings.

Personalizing The Above As Christian Affirmations

Job 33:12

  • I am humbled by the Lord’s greatness.
  • I will trust in God’s superiority over human understanding.

Isaiah 55:8-9

  • I am open to the Lord’s wisdom that surpasses my own.
  • I will follow the Lord’s ways, acknowledging they are higher than mine.

Psalm 50:21

  • I am under the Lord’s guidance, corrected by His righteousness.
  • I will accept the Lord’s discipline to set my life in order.

Job 11:7-8

  • I am in awe of the Lord’s unfathomable nature.
  • I will seek to know the Lord, understanding His perfection is beyond my grasp.

Romans 11:33

  • I am enriched by the Lord’s deep wisdom and knowledge.
  • I will rejoice in the vastness of God’s wisdom that I cannot fathom.

1 Corinthians 1:25

  • I am strengthened by the Lord’s power, which overshadows human strength.
  • I will rely on God’s wisdom, which exceeds human understanding.

Psalm 113:5

  • I am in worship of the Lord, who reigns above all.
  • I will exalt the Lord, acknowledging there is none like Him.
See also  God Is With Thee in All That Thou Doest

To Whom Then Will Ye Liken Me, or Shall I Be Equal?

Isaiah 40:25: "To whom then will ye liken me, or shall I be equal? saith the Holy One."

Isaiah 40:25
: "To whom then will ye liken me, or shall I be equal? saith the Holy One."

“To whom then will ye liken me”: Here, God is challenging the Israelites to find a comparison to Him, asserting that there is none. It’s a rhetorical question that implies no one and nothing is comparable to God.

“or shall I be equal?”: This continues the thought that there is no equal to God. It reinforces the idea of God’s uniqueness and supreme power above all.

“saith the Holy One”: “The Holy One” is a title for God, emphasizing His purity and separateness from creation. By using this title, the verse is underlining God’s authority in posing this question.

In essence, this verse from Isaiah highlights the incomparable nature of God. The passage seeks to remind the Israelites of God's unparalleled position as the creator and sustainer of the universe, and that attempting to liken Him to anything else would be futile.

When I Consider Thy Heavens, the Work of Thy Fingers, the Moon and the Stars

Psalm 8:3-4: "When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?"

Also see: God Is Greater Than Our Heart, and Knoweth All Things

Psalm 8:3-4: "When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?"

“When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers”: David is looking at the sky and acknowledging that the heavens are the creation of God, intricately fashioned by Him. The term “the work of thy fingers” suggests a personal touch, as if each star has been carefully placed by God’s own hands.

“the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained”: The moon and the stars are often seen as symbols of God’s order in creation. The word “ordained” means that God has not only created them but has also set them in their precise order and function.

“What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?”: This question is the Psalmist expressing wonder that God, who created the vast universe, would even consider humans, who seem insignificant in comparison. The phrase “son of man” is a Hebrew expression for human beings. The word “mindful” indicates that God remembers and cares for humans, and “visitest” implies that God isn’t distant but rather personally involved in the lives of people.

This passage speaks to the humility and gratitude one might feel in recognizing their smallness in the grand scheme of the cosmos, yet also understanding that they are valued by God. It’s a powerful expression of faith in a caring creator.

Canst Thou by Searching Find Out God? Canst Thou Find Out the Almighty Unto Perfection?

Job 11:7-8: “Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know?”
Job 11:7-8: “Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know?”

“Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection?”: These questions highlight the limitless nature of God and the limitations of human understanding. The rhetorical questions suggest that it’s impossible for humans to fully grasp the essence or the magnitude of God through searching or their own efforts.

“It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do?”: This part draws a comparison between the immensity of the heavens and human ability. It implies that just as the heavens are vast and beyond reach, so is the nature of God beyond human capability to fully understand or alter.

See also  Prioritize Loving God First: 10 Bible Insights

“deeper than hell; what canst thou know?”: Here, the depth of hell is used to describe the profound mystery of God. Just as hell is depicted as a deep and unfathomable place, the knowledge of God is too deep for humans to fully comprehend.


O the Depth of the Riches Both of the Wisdom and Knowledge of God!

Romans 11:33: "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!"
Romans 11:33: "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!"
  • “O the depth of the riches”: This phrase suggests a profound admiration for God’s abundant wealth, not in material terms but in His divine attributes and provisions.
  • “both of the wisdom and knowledge of God”: Here, wisdom refers to the application of knowledge. It’s saying that God’s understanding and the way He applies it are boundlessly deep.
  • “how unsearchable are his judgments”: This means that God’s decisions are beyond human comprehension. We can’t fully grasp the ‘how’ and ‘why’ behind what God determines is right.
  • “and his ways past finding out!”: This part tells us that the methods and paths God takes are too complex for humans to understand or predict. They’re mysterious and not to be fully known by us.

The Foolishness of God Is Wiser Than Men; and the Weakness of God Is Stronger Than Men

1 Corinthians 1:25: “Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.”
1 Corinthians 1:25: “Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.

the foolishness of God is wiser than men”: This part of the verse isn’t calling God foolish. Instead, it suggests that even what seems like foolishness when attributed to God, is still far beyond the wisdom of humans.

and the weakness of God is stronger than men”: Similarly, this isn’t implying that God is weak. It’s a way to say that even the most minimal display of God’s power or what may seem like weakness in comparison to His almighty nature, is still much stronger than the greatest strength found in mankind.

The verse emphasizes the vast difference between God and humans. It highlights that God’s ways and thoughts are on a completely different level than ours. What we might consider foolish or weak in human terms, in relation to God, is superior and powerful.

Who Is Like Unto the LORD Our God, Who Dwelleth on High?

Psalm 113:5: “Who is like unto the LORD our God, who dwelleth on high?”
Psalm 113:5: “Who is like unto the LORD our God, who dwelleth on high?”

“Who is like unto the LORD our God”: This question rhetorically emphasizes the uniqueness and incomparability of God. It implies that there is no one and nothing that can be equated with the LORD in terms of power, majesty, and holiness.

“who dwelleth on high”: This phrase indicates God’s supreme and exalted position. It is a metaphor for both His physical elevation above the heavens and His status above all creation.

In essence, Psalm 113:5 is a verse of praise that distinguishes God’s transcendence and His supreme authority over everything else. It serves to remind the believers of God's unparalleled nature and His place of honor in the universe.

Thou Hast Made the Heaven and the Earth by Thy Great Power and Stretched Out Arm, and There Is Nothing Too Hard for Thee

There Is Nothing Too Hard for God
Jeremiah 32:17: "Ah Lord GOD! behold, thou hast made the heaven and the earth by thy great power and stretched out arm, and there is nothing too hard for thee:”

“Ah Lord GOD!”: This exclamation marks a prayerful recognition of God’s authority and power. It is an expression of awe and reverence, acknowledging God’s supreme position.

See also  Be Not Afraid For The LORD Thy God Is Among You

“behold, thou hast made the heaven and the earth”: The speaker is reflecting on God’s role as the Creator. This statement affirms the belief that God is responsible for the creation of all things, both in the heavens and on the earth.

“by thy great power and stretched out arm”: This part of the verse uses vivid imagery to describe God’s mighty power. The “stretched out arm” symbolizes God’s ability to reach into the physical world and exert His will.

“and there is nothing too hard for thee”: The verse concludes with a declaration of God’s omnipotence. It expresses a deep confidence in God’s capability to handle any situation, no matter how difficult it may appear to humans.

The verse as a whole reinforces the belief in God's limitless power and his role as the ultimate creator and sustainer of the universe. It serves as a reminder that no matter the challenges faced, believers can trust in God's ability to overcome them.

Great Is Our Lord, and of Great Power: His Understanding Is Infinite

Psalm 147:5 reads: “Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite.”

Also see: But Our God Is in the Heavens: He Hath Done Whatsoever He Hath Pleased

Psalm 147:5 reads: “Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite.”
  • “Great is our Lord”: This expresses the magnificence of God, acknowledging His majesty and supreme authority.
  • “and of great power”: Here, the psalmist emphasizes God’s omnipotence, meaning God has unlimited power and can do anything.
  • “his understanding is infinite”: This line highlights God’s omniscience, indicating that God’s wisdom and knowledge have no bounds or limits.
The verse as a whole praises God's grandeur, mighty power, and limitless understanding, setting Him apart from humans in might and wisdom.

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Allan Wilson is the creator of the Scriptural Thinking Affirmations Package. Featuring over 200 minutes of mp3 audio Bible affirmations complete with background music. The package comes with the original affirmations PDF ebook and many bonus affirmation Bible studies as well. The affirmations are designed to help you call to remembrance all of the wonderful benefits of being in Christ and the marvelous privilege of being a child of God.

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